News

Shepparton teenager sentenced following New Year’s Eve assault

By Liz Mellino

A court has heard how a Shepparton teenager struck a victim with a metal chair following a verbal argument which broke out in Mooroopna late last year.

A Children's Court heard the teenager, 15, who cannot be named for legal reasons, became involved in a verbal argument with a group of people on a footpath in Mooroopna on New Year's Eve.

“A witness observed the accused with a glass bottle in his hand, the accused approached the victim and tried to hit him with the bottle,” the court was told on Monday.

“The accused threw the bottle at the victim who deflected it away with his right hand ... the accused then picked up a metal chair and struck the victim with the chair.”

The court heard two victims were taken to hospital following the incident, with one suffering a laceration behind his right ear while the other suffered severe bruising to his hands.

On January 13 the accused was arrested in relation to another matter, where he told police he was a "bit drunk" at the time of the incident on New Year's Eve.

The court were told on June 4 this year the teenager attended an address in Numurkah Rd, Shepparton where he demanded a bike be returned to him.

“(The victim) asked the accused to leave ... the accused became erratic and aggressive and produced a knife saying I'll cut you,” the court heard.

A witness produced a baseball bat and chased the accused from the scene before he returned five minutes later with a large metal bar.

“The accused approached a blue Holden sedan which was parked at the property, the accused used the metal bar to smash the rear window of the vehicle,” the court was told.

The teenager was arrested and interviewed by police the following day.

The court heard he was on bail at the time.

The teenager's lawyer said her client had spent 46 days on remand for the offending.

She said the accused had entered early pleas of guilty at "every opportunity available", describing her client as a "vulnerable young person".

“He had a very disrupted period, three weeks of homelessness ... periods of being in detention at school,” the lawyer told the court.

“It has been very difficult for (the accused) to settle this year back into a routine.”

She urged the magistrate to place him on a youth supervision order to "address some of the risk factors" her client presented.

When sentencing, the magistrate said the teenager's track record for offences was "just not good".

He acknowledged the accused's tough upbringing, saying however this did not justify the offences committed.

“Hoping if you work with youth justice and turn this around you can be a positive member of the community,” the magistrate said.

“If it doesn't work out that's going to be your fault.”

The teenager was sentenced to a 12-month youth supervision order.